Epicurus and his gods
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Epicurus and his gods (E picure et ses dieux) by A. J. Festugie re

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Published by Harvard in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Epicurus.,
  • Greece -- Religion.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Photocopy. Ann Arbor, Mich. : University Microfilms International, 1983. 18 cm.

StatementTranslated by C. W. Chilton.
The Physical Object
Paginationxiii, 100 p. ;
Number of Pages100
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14195981M

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COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus. Epicurus was a much maligned philosopher and Norman Wentworth DeWitt produced a superb study to organise existing data into a biographical sketch, present a fresh interpretation of his doctrines and also to place Epicurus as part of the transition from the classical 5/5(4). The Cambridge Companion to Epicureanism, ed. James Warren ().A much more academic text, but extremely well put together and well sourced. The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius, ed. Stuart Gillespie and Philip Hardie ().. On the Nature of the Gods (De Natura Deorum) by Cicero (c. 45 BCE). This one is a dialogue laid out in three books, each of which discuss the theology of different. Philodemus says that here, Epicurus addressed the “rapports of affinity, and also of hostility, that gods have with certain persons“. Book 14 Based on the condensation of water (which can be seen turning into a gas/vapor, and also into solid ice), some ancient philosophers said that it can be inferred that all things come from a single.

I had already taken a liking to Epicurus' teachings before I started reading this book, so I might be quite biased, but I still did find a whole lot of relevant knowledge in this book. Although written in the 3rd century B.C., one seeking happiness will, still in this modern age, surely be /5. Epicurus ( B.C.) was born in Samos and died in Athens. He studied at Plato's Academy when it was run by Xenocrates. Later, when he joined his family on Colophon, Epicurus studied under Nausiphanes, who introduced him to the philosophy of /7 Epicurus bought a house in . Epicurus later served in the Athenian military from the ages of 18 to Once Epicurus had completed his service, he settled in Athens between and BCE and founded his philosophical school there Epicurus espoused a philosophy based on materialism and empiricism that was heavily influenced by the Greek thinkers Leucippus and Democritus. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Festugière, A.J. (André Jean), Epicurus and his gods. Oxford, Blackwell, (OCoLC)

  the aim of this study is threefold: first, to organize the surviving data on the life of Epicurus into a consequential biographical sketch so as to throw some light upon the growth of his personality and the development of his philosophy; second, to present a new interpretation of his doctrines based upon less emended remains of his writings; and third, to win attention for the importance of. Epicurus also distinguishes between physical and mental pleasures and pains, and argues that anxiety about the future, especially fear of the gods and fear of death, are the greatest obstructions. Epicurus, Greek philosopher, author of an ethical philosophy of simple pleasure, friendship, and retirement. He founded schools of philosophy that survived directly from the 4th century bc until the 4th century ad. Epicurus was born on the island of Samos of Athenian parents who had gone there as. Epicurus in his Letter to Menoeceus (Translation by Cyril Bailey) The only thing that seems to separate the gods from this perfect human being is the lifespan. The gods are, as it has been expressed, indestructible and blissful, people can, according to Epicurus, achieve this bliss but .