Historical dictionary of film noir
Read Online
Share

Historical dictionary of film noir by Andrew Spicer

  • 487 Want to read
  • ·
  • 86 Currently reading

Published by Scarecrow Press in Lanham .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and filmography.

StatementAndrew Spicer
SeriesHistorical dictionaries of literature and the arts -- no. 38, Historical dictionaries of literature and the arts -- no. 38.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPN1995.9.F54 S685 2010
The Physical Object
Paginationl, 473 p. :
Number of Pages473
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24547414M
ISBN 100810859602, 0810873788
ISBN 109780810859609, 9780810873780
LC Control Number2009041150
OCLC/WorldCa455871411

Download Historical dictionary of film noir

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Film noir-literally "black cinema"-is the label customarily given to a group of black and white American films, mostly crime thrillers, made between and Today there is considerable dispute about what are the shared features that classify a noir film, and therefore which films should be included in 3/5.   Historical Dictionary of Film Noir. Film noir_literally 'black cinema'_is the label customarily given to a group of black and white American films. It consists of a chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography, a filmography, and more than cross-referenced dictionary entries on every aspect of film noir and neo-noir, including key film personnel (actors, cinematographers, composers, directors, producers, set designers, and writers), themes, issues, influences, visual style, cycles of films (e.g., amnesiac noirs), the representation of . The Historical Dictionary of Film Noir is a comprehensive guide that ranges from to present day neo-noir. It consists of a chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography, a filmography, and over cross-referenced dictionary entries on every aspect of film noir and neo-noir, including key films, personnel (actors, cinematographers, compos Read more.

The crime film genre consists of detective films, gangster films, suspense thrillers, film noir, and caper films and is produced throughout the world. Crime film was there at the birth of cinema, and it has accompanied cinema over more than a century of history, passing from silent films to talkies, from black-and-white to color. The genre includes such classics as The Maltese Falcon, The.   The Historical Dictionary of Film Noir is a comprehensive guide that ranges from to present day neo-noir. It consists of a chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography, a filmography, and over cross-referenced dictionary entries on every aspect of film noir and neo-noir, including key films, personnel, themes, issues, influences, visual style, cycles of films, the representation of .   Film Noir offers new perspectives on this highly popular and influential film genre, providing a useful overview of its historical evolution and the many critical debates over its stylistic elements.. Brings together a range of perspectives on a topic that has been much discussed but remains notoriously ill-defined; Traces the historical development of the genre, usefully exploring the. Film Noir: The Encyclopedia. A handsome, arm-straining book which has massive, ambitious coverage. This is an A-Z encyclopedia and is probably the most useful in terms of tracking down more obscure items. This is a book that is very up to date with lots of modern films noirs.

  L.A. Confidential, by James Ellroy The third book in Ellroy’s L.A. Quartet marks the point at which noir invaded the literary world and made a home for ’s s Los Angeles is corrupt, violent, soaked in lust and addictions, and populated by crooked cops and criminals.   Finding Books on Film Genres, Styles and Categories Historical dictionary of film noir by Andrew Spicer. Film noir: the encyclopedia by Alain Silver. Encyclopedia of film noir by Geoff Mayer and Brian McDonnell. Horror. A-Z of horror films by Howard Maxford. Science Fiction & Fantasy. Film Noir (literally 'black film" or "black cinema') was coined by French film critics (first by Nino Frank in ) who noticed the trend of how 'dark', downbeat and black the looks and themes were of many American crime and detective films released in France to theatres during and following World War II, such as The Maltese Falcon (), Murder, My Sweet (), Double Indemnity (), The Woman in . Origins and later proponents. Beginning with 's The Bride Wore Black, author Cornell Woolrich wrote a series of six unrelated noir novels with "black" in the title, three of which were adapted for film in the s. The word "noir" was used by the Paris-based publisher Gallimard in as the title for its Série Noire crime fiction imprint. In the English-speaking world, the term.